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Relationship of Neurofilament Light (NfL) and Cognitive Performance in a Sample of Mexican Americans with Normal Cognition, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

[ Vol. 17 , Issue. 13 ]

Author(s):

James R. Hall*, Leigh A. Johnson, Melissa Peterson, David Julovich, Tori Como and Sid E. O’Bryant   Pages 1214 - 1220 ( 7 )

Abstract:


<P>Introduction: This study characterized the relationship between plasma NfL and cognition in a community-based sample of older Mexican Americans. </P><P> Methods: 544 participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests and were diagnosed using clinical criteria. NfL was assayed using Simoa. NfL levels across groups and tests were analyzed. </P><P> Results: Difference in NfL was found between normal and impaired groups and was related to global cognition, processing speed, executive functions and a list of learning tasks with a significant negative effect for all diagnostic groups. NfL had a negative impact on processing speed, attention, executive functions and delayed and recognition memory for both normal and MCI groups. </P><P> Conclusion: The research supports plasma NfL as a marker of cognitive impairment related to neurodegenerative processes in Mexican Americans and may be a marker of early changes in cognition in those with normal cognition and at risk for developing MCI.</P>

Keywords:

Neurofilament light, mexican americans, cognition processes, normal cognition, MCI, dementia.

Affiliation:

Institute for Translational Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, Institute for Translational Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, Institute for Translational Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, Institute for Translational Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, Institute for Translational Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, Institute for Translational Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX



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